Archive | January, 2011

The Future of PaaS in the Enterprise – The Service Oriented Platform

26 Jan

Anyone who followed Cloud Computing last year watched several changes occur throughout the space.  These changes were happening in the view of what Public, Private, and Hybrid Clouds were defined as, the interest in IaaS solutions in the Enterprise and within Service Providers, and finally a renewed interest in the potential of PaaS.

Currently Public PaaS solutions are focused on core compute functionality and persistent services all of which are being backed by some mix of IaaS (with or without Virtualization, more with than without though).  Why are so many Public PaaS focused on their IaaS underpinnings?  Two reasons come to mind, IaaS is easier for customers and IT to understand and yet generic enough to have the broadest appeal.  This is important in the continuing evolution of the Cloud market as a whole, we need the widest adoption possible early on for any Cloud Platforms to take off.

Now, focusing in on the set of events around PaaS in the past year brings us to the rumors that surrounded EngineYard’s acquisition by VMware (which never happened and now we see that Amazon is working with them on a Ruby on Rails Elastic Beanstalk), Heroku was acquired by Salesforce.com, VMware announced the Open PaaS solution, and Microsoft will fight with anyone who calls Azure anything but a PaaS.  All of this Public facing PaaS news sounds great, but I’m sure you are thinking how does this translate to Enterprise?

I wondered this same thing and began to try to figure out just where it all leads.

What is the Future of Enterprise PaaS?

Public Cloud Services are always different from Private Cloud Services, many people think that Hybrid is something easy but miss the nuances involved with implementing Hybrid Clouds.  I’m not saying that achieving a Hybrid model is impossible, just that there are many hurdles and few have working solutions that seem to address most or all of them.

PaaS in an Enterprise will operate as a Service Oriented Platform.  That sounds like a silky smooth sentence doesn’t it?  But there is substance behind the statement.  Today the most advanced Public PaaS platforms are focusing on generic, on-demand, multi-tenant, infrastructure components, and other core capabilities.  What Enterprises will need for PaaS will be this plus many other services including specialized components such as vertical specific ERP and CRM solutions exposed as services, legacy solutions with service bridges, Big Data service connectors, and many more.  As these capabilities get built and each former “Silo” gets exposed as a service a Platform will emerge.

About the Service Oriented Platform:

Something to understand is that each business is different, it was formed differently and while it operates most likely in a similar fashion to other businesses in that market, it is still different.  This difference becomes even more pronounced when the needs are pushed to IT (Operations and Development).  This would be the equivalent to the Butterfly Effect in IT.

Why does the Butterfly Effect matter for an Enterprise Service Oriented Platform?

Because it means that each Enterprise Service Oriented Platform will be DIFFERENT than all others (maybe only marginally, but still different).  Each service exposed to the ESOP will be a new capability that Devs can leverage as they put together Apps on top of the Enterprise PaaS.

Something that may be important to realize is that IT Operations may view the solution as an ESOP while Devs may view it as an Enterprise PaaS.  I think both of these are actually correct and will talk about the same thing, it is just how it is being viewed and by who, but it is still the same thing.

Hybrid Clouds will be exposed as another service capability:

Hybrid Clouds will be Public Cloud services that are exposed either directly or indirectly to the ESOP.  The ESOP will have the control, authentication, metering, and likely the QoS.  The EPaaS will have the allowed/exposed services and resources from the Public Cloud.  This will be at a different level than simply pushing and pulling VMs, Virtual Hardisks, or Creating VPNs.

I’m interested in people’s thoughts and comments:

Comment on this Post or Follow Me on Twitter – @mccrory

Current PaaS Patterns – Types of PaaS

23 Jan

There are many definititions of PaaS that I have run across, the most succinct of which is “A Service where Code is uploaded and executed”.  While succinct, this leaves a lot of “wiggle room” for what PaaS really is.  The secret is PaaS isn’t one thing, it is a broad array of things that can be used and mixed together.  What model ore TYPE of PaaS determines what capabilities and limitations the platform will have.

The Type 1 PaaS – Upload Your Environment

Type 1 PaaS Examples

This style of PaaS is an option from several different providers including Amazon EC2 and Microsoft Azure with the VM Role.  By imaging and then uploading an environment packaged as a VM, you are allowed to run legacy systems in Cloud environments

The Type 2 PaaS – Upload Your Compiled Application

Type 2 PaaS Examples

This PaaS is where an environment is already provided and you are uploading and executing an Application that was written/is supported by that PaaS environment. This could be a preconfigured Amazon EC2 VM, a RackSpace Cloud VM, Microsoft Azure Role, or any of the other dozens of Cloud providers.

The Type 3 PaaS – Upload Your Packaged Application

Type 3 PaaS Examples

PaaS here is presented as a container that is more restricted than a traditional environment and is more stringent on code.  This could be a Java WAR file for example that leverages a container such as Apache Tomcat, Amazon’s Elastic Beanstalk is a good example of this.  The solution could also just be a custom JVM such as the one that Google App Engine uses (where your App is a JAR).  Why is this different than a Type 2 PaaS?  It is a container in an environment, not just an OS environment like Linux or Windows.

The Type 4 PaaS – Upload Your Code

Type 4 PaaS Examples

This type of PaaS allows source code to be uploaded where the compilation happens in the PaaS itself.  By accepting the code as the uploaded payload a greater level of insight as to what the resource requirements are of the code can be gotten, which offers more versatility from the platform.  An example would be VMware’s Open PaaS (which is in Alpha currently).  Open PaaS accepts many different code types, looks at what the requirements are and adjusts the environment based on what the needs of the code are.  Other examples include Heroku and Engine Yard, both do Ruby on Rails. When the Ruby on Rails code is uploaded for example, then a MySQL server instance is created to support the application amongst other things that happen.  Nearly everything that is needed is allocated automatically on demand.

The Type 5 PaaS – Upload App/Platform Specific Code

Type 5 PaaS Example

PaaS here would only allow specific code which is designed to work as logic or an extension of the Platform is allowed.  While this is a highly restrictive form of PaaS, it can also be powerful and is a natural move for a Software as a Service provider looking to allow cutsomization.  Salesforce.com is a great example with their App Logic using Apex Code.  Apex Code allows a level of customization and extension to the Salesforce solution using their own blended Java/C# like syntax.

The future of PaaS is in leveraging many of these models to best meet design decisions and customer needs.  The biggest question will be what happens in the future when Enterprises want to adopt and adapt PaaS in their Data Centers.  While the economies of scale will always be with Public Cloud PaaS providers, there are benefits to having PaaS implementations inside the Enterprise.

In my next post I will talk about where PaaS could go.

Hyper9 is acquired by SolarWinds

19 Jan

The company I founded a few years ago has been acquired by SolarWinds Inc.  I’m pleased with the outcome and proud of all of those involved in the hard work it has taken to get here.

Details can be found here

CLASH – CLoud Admin SHell

11 Jan

It has been several weeks since I have posted to this blog.  I would blame this on the holidays, but that would be inaccurate as it has been something far more insidious!

What is CLASH?
CLASH is a universal shell.  What is a universal shell?  First, by universal I mean that it is intended to run on all major desktop operating system platforms including:
Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7

Mac OSX Leopard, Mac OSX Snow Leopard
Ubuntu Linux, and most other flavors of Linux
——————————–
Now the shell portion is a bit different.  Since this is a CLoud Admin SHell, Cloud is an important part of idea.  In this initial prototype I went through many experiments in learning the nuances of JRuby <follow on post link here>, but have been able to get a reasonable working version of VIJava (the interface I’m using to get JRuby to work with VMware vCenter/vSphere).

Great, so what can I do with this prototype?

-You can try it out on any of the platforms listed above!
-If you are on a Windows System, you can either edit the clash.bat file and put in your server’s IP or name along with a username and password to connect
-If you are on Mac or Linux, you can simply type ./clash –Server 127.0.0.1 –Username administrator –Password password to connect 

-The following are the working commands:
> Get-VM SomeVMName
Above gets the VM object and prints out the Guest Operating System type

> $result
This command prints the name of the VM object
> $result $
This displays the methods available to the VM object
> $result $.get
This shows only the methods with “get” in them
> $result $.set
This shows only the methods with “set” in them
> $result $.find something
This shows only them methods that contain “something” in them
> $result method
This will execute the method against the object (i.e. $result getName will display the name property of the VM object from Get-VM)
> disconnect
This will cleanly disconnect from the vCenter / vSphere server
> Start-VM SomeVMName
This command is flakey at the moment, this will be fixed when the next prototype is released in a few weeks
> Stop-VM SomeVMName
This is in the same state as Start-VM
> Get-VM SomeVMName > $result getName
This allows a limited form of piping in clash by using the > as an operator (you must have whitespace on both sides of the > symbol.

Where is this headed?
After many experiments, it will be broken out into a flexible system that allows many different options and cool capabilities against not only vCenter and vSphere, but most Cloud platforms as well.  Currently planned platforms include:
-Amazon EC2 and S3
-Rackspace
-(Looking for the next provider for this list)

Other interfaces to the shell (for both input and output) will include a Web interface, I’m looking for thoughts on other types of interfaces desired.

How will this work?
Below is my latest planned diagram for how I hope/think things should work:

Where can I get the Prototype?
You can get the code from GitHub here
You can download the entire package here

Installation Directions (AGAIN, this is a PROTOTYPE, it does NOT follow best practices)
1.) Make sure that you have Java 1.5 or Above Installed
Download Java from Here

2.) Install JRuby 1.5.6
Download JRuby from Here
3.) Follow the JRuby Setup Instructions Here
4.) Download the CLASH prototype/alpha-1 from GitHub (See Above Links)
Unzip/Tar it to c:\clash or /clash directory in ROOT
5.) Start clash by going to c:\clash\bin\ or /clash/bin
On Windows edit clash.bat to contain the correct IP Address, Username, and Password
then run clash.bat
On Mac and Linux type ./clash –Server 127.0.0.1 –Username administrator –Password password
Make sure to select the IP or Name of a valid vCenter / vSphere Server
6.) Play with clash
A Request:
Please supply feedback to me through comments to this post or communicate directly with me through Twitter – my handle is @mccrory
I’m looking for ideas/things that you would like to see clash do, better commands, capabilities, features, etc.